p01 Kansas City Southern
Skip to main content

Recent Topics

clip
Strange email from "Adobe"
by AaronH
Today at 04:59:44 PM

xx
Reset Zero Point
by Slappy
Today at 04:34:16 PM

xx
Device CMYK
by Joe
July 16, 2018, 01:25:22 PM

xx

clip
Font issue PDF just sits there...
by Diddler
July 15, 2018, 07:28:49 PM

xx

xx
12 page Sheetwork_fixed?
by frailer
July 09, 2018, 11:17:56 PM

xx
remapping colorbars
by frailer
July 09, 2018, 11:13:49 PM

xx
FREE InDesign Scripts
by pabney
July 09, 2018, 09:53:44 AM

xx
Locked PDF - for what it's worth
by Joe
July 07, 2018, 09:20:09 AM

xx
EU Article 13
by born2print
July 05, 2018, 06:14:29 PM

xx

Topic: postscript commans to rip  (Read 6497 times) previous topic - next topic

postscript commans to rip

Does anyone know of any sort of a postscript command, that comes along with a composite
file that contains CMYK separations  that instructs the RIP to process some of the plates
and ignores other plates from the CMYK.

thanks

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #1
That's a little vague. Is this something that is happening or something that you want to do? Give us a little more detail please.
"... profile says he's a seven-foot tall ex-basketball pro, Hindu guru drag queen alien." ~Jet Black

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #2
well i work at a newspaper using the cci system.

we have a choice of sending color plates at a separate time than the black plate

it helps with workflow.

we have the system set to send a single composite file using
an output setting that cci calls "Composite In Rip"

it's my understanding it's one file with all with all four plate CMYK pre separated

I am told that depending on how we send the postscript file, black only or color only
that all four plate are sent in this single composite file with postscript instructions
to our Harlequin rip to disregard color plates if the user sends black only and disregards
the black plate if color only is sent.

Are there such postscript commands that a RIP understands. 

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #3

....it's my understanding it's one file with all with all four plate CMYK pre separated... 


I think that is an incorrect assumption. Your description seems to indicate that you are sending a single composite file and that the Harlequin RIP separates this file into C, M, Y and K plates.

It still isn't clear to me what you are looking for but if I understand you correctly you simply want a setup file that switches OFF in-rip separations (outputting only a K plate) or that switches ON in-rip separations (creating 4 plates). Or is it that you want commands as well to, for instance, only output C, M and K, leaving out the Y plate?

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #4
I have used Harlequin rips in the past and there isn't much to them really. It all separates at some point, then rasterizes for use on the imaging device (film, CTP). When I was using a Harlequin, I would send only separated files since the older Harlequin rips did not have an option to separate a composite file. To my knowledge, the postscript file doesn't contain information like you speak of. A function like that would usually be something you set up in the rip or workflow to where it would separate the composite file and hold the individual separations to allow the operator to selectively release the plates that need to be run.

The "composite in rip" setting that you refer to sounds like the ticket but you may have to check the settings for that control. It's hard for me to remember without the system right in front of me. When you rip a composite file using the composite in rip queue, does it then generate 4 tiffs to send to plate/film? If that's the case, you should be able to manually delete the unwanted plates.
"... profile says he's a seven-foot tall ex-basketball pro, Hindu guru drag queen alien." ~Jet Black

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #5
thank you for your responses

i think i need to get a clarification from cci as to whether
"composite in rip" means what i think it does which is one file
four seps.

i never thought the rip did the separations.

they have another output option which is "Plain Composite" which i am pretty
sure the a single file with no separations inside it.

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #6
'in-rip separations' is the typical terminology for describing a mechanism to do the separations in the RIP. Based on that 'composite in rip' would mean 'composite but with postscript commands to activate in-rip seps' and 'plain composite' would be what you send to a color printer. It is however best if CCI tell you what these options mean since I am only guessing.

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #7
 hey folks i think i have it going using the rips'

"Separation Manager"

CMYK Composite -> Separations is the settings i'm using

so i was mistaken in thinking Composite in rip were a collection of seps in one file
a composite can be postscript with separation commands but no CMYK seps
i always thought it was a RGB.

thanks for your kind and timely responses

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #8
Hmm..you "have it going", jculler, but here's my spin on it...the reason I'm dipping my oar in is not that I've got anything more to add to earendil's and laurens' input; more that your last comments are a little confusing still.

"Composite", the way I try and simplify it in my own head, is just what it sounds like, a composite/wrapped/bundled...[whatever description], single file which contains ALL the necessary information for a suitably capable RIP to interpret and render the "bundled" separations; to 1-bit TIFFs, usually, one for each process colour + any Spot colours. Could be a PostScript file; could be a PDF. Depends what your RIP's capable of handling. Either the first, or both. As earendil says, there are controls within the Harly RIP to THEN either delete or not output various seps/colours; [if there is such a need]. Our first RIP was a Harly, and we could definitely do that.

There may be other reasons to PRE-separate when you "print" the file from InDes...wherever. In that case you would be sending separations to the RIP.

Hope I haven't laboured the point too much... :rolleyes:

Fujifilm XMF/AdobeCC/PitStop Pro/Black Magic/ScreenPlateRite_Fujifilm ZP processless. 28" Komoris  |  Forgotten good guys: Dennis Ritchie, Burrell Smith, Bill Atkinson, Richard Stallman
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Too old for this.. but.. there's that question of income. And lack of it if I stop.
~~~~~~

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #9

I see, well back to my original concept of a composite .
One thing is for sure, there is a wealth of expertise on this forum.

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #10
hi

if you send composite from whatever programme you dont have the option to turn off a colour <seperation> - so just delete the unwanted colours at the rip - just like frailer said really. composite - it's name speaks for itself.

in rip seperations - well then yes, since you are generating seperated postscript, you do have the option of turning off colours <seperations> at application level

Leave me here in my - stark raving sick sad little world

Re: postscript commans to rip

Reply #11

well i work at a newspaper using the cci system.

we have a choice of sending color plates at a separate time than the black plate

it helps with workflow.

we have the system set to send a single composite file using
an output setting that cci calls "Composite In Rip"

it's my understanding it's one file with all with all four plate CMYK pre separated

I am told that depending on how we send the postscript file, black only or color only
that all four plate are sent in this single composite file with postscript instructions
to our Harlequin rip to disregard color plates if the user sends black only and disregards
the black plate if color only is sent.

Are there such postscript commands that a RIP understands. 



I do know that you can create an different page setup and film setup to only print one particular color.  I have one that I use for cyan and black.  since the PDF's that I receive will be one color (cyan + black).

I hope this helps  javascript:void(0);

Chrisj