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Topic: Color Copiers (Read 1798 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • Tracy
  • [*][*]
Re: Color Copiers
Reply #45
Can someone tell me the difference between no color management
and adobe color management, when sending to copiers?

I see a pretty big difference in the 2 when I send to our Xante


  • Joe
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
  • Master of Nothing
Re: Color Copiers
Reply #46
According to Adobe:

What is a color management system?

Color-matching problems result from various devices and software using different color spaces. One solution is to have a system that interprets and translates color accurately between devices. A color management system (CMS) compares the color space in which a color was created to the color space in which the same color will be output, and makes the necessary adjustments to represent the color as consistently as possible among different devices.

A color management system translates colors with the help of color profiles. A profile is a mathematical description of a device's color space. For example, a scanner profile tells a color management system how your scanner "sees" colors. Adobe color management uses ICC profiles, a format defined by the International Color Consortium (ICC) as a cross-platform standard.

Because no single color-translation method is ideal for all types of graphics, a color management system provides a choice of rendering intents, or translation methods, so that you can apply a method appropriate to a particular graphics element. For example, a color translation method that preserves correct relationships among colors in a wildlife photograph may alter the colors in a logo containing flat tints of color.

Note: Don't confuse color management with color correction. A color management system won't correct an image that was saved with tonal or color balance problems. It provides an environment where you can evaluate images reliably in the context of your final output.

Do you need color management?

Without a color management system, your color specifications are device-dependent. You might not need color management if your production process is tightly controlled for one medium only. For example, you or your print service provider can tailor CMYK images and specify color values for a known, specific set of printing conditions.

The value of color management increases when you have more variables in your production process. Color management is recommended if you anticipate reusing color graphics for print and online media, using various kinds of devices within a single medium (such as different printing presses), or if you manage multiple workstations.

You will benefit from a color management system if you need to accomplish any of the following:

Get predictable and consistent color output on multiple output devices including color separations, your desktop printer, and your monitor. Color management is especially useful for adjusting color for devices with a relatively limited gamut, such as a four-color process printing press.

Accurately soft-proof (preview) a color document on your monitor by making it simulate a specific output device. (Soft-proofing is subject to the limitations of monitor display, and other factors such as room lighting conditions.)

Accurately evaluate and consistently incorporate color graphics from many different sources if they also use color management, and even in some cases if they don't.

Send color documents to different output devices and media without having to manually adjust colors in documents or original graphics. This is valuable when creating images that will eventually be used both in print and online.

Print color correctly to an unknown color output device; for example, you could store a document online for consistently reproducible on‑demand color printing anywhere in the world.
Mac OS 10.12 Sierra | Prinergy 7.5 | Adobe Creative Cloud 2017 | Two Luscher XPose 160 CTP units

Prepress: One who does precision guess work based on unreliable data provided by those of questionable knowledge.

  • Tracy
  • [*][*]
Re: Color Copiers
Reply #47
Thanks Joe, whew! 
I just found this huge color difference on our Xante Envelope copier
It's a thorn in my side :laugh:

  • Slappy
  • [*]
Re: Color Copiers
Reply #48
Ilumina? I schooled the Sales Twerps early on not to expect much in the way of consistency. A lot of what happens depends so heavily on the stock and that is such a crapshoot based on what the paper house spits out that week. Sorry, it's a copier with a passable feed system. If they want faster/more predictable then go iJet or something similar.
A little diddie 'bout black 'n cyan...two reflective colors doin' the best they can.

  • Tracy
  • [*][*]
Re: Color Copiers
Reply #49
I accidentally found that sending to Xante using Acrobat Color management has better color than no color management
still experimenting, but this is interesting.