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Author Topic: Should I convert RAW files to DNG?  (Read 1567 times)

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Offline jannatul18

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Should I convert RAW files to DNG?
« on: July 02, 2016, 04:49:40 AM »
Should I convert RAW files to DNG when importing photos into Adobe Lightroom? Can you please let me know the difference between the two?

Offline Diddler

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Re: Should I convert RAW files to DNG?
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2016, 12:00:49 AM »
A .DNG (Digital Negative Graphics) file is Adobe's version of a RAW file. They can be a little smaller in size in my experiments its about 10% or so. Years ago I used to convert the files to DNG to save disc space, but with HDD being so cheap these day I don't bother.
A RAW file is just that, RAW. It has no editing and is just the image data captured by the camera sensor. So Canon is RAW.cr2 & 
Nikon.Nef but they are just RAW data off the sensor in respective brand formats. All you are doing is converting RAW (Canon/Nikon/whatever brand) to Adobe's format of DNG.  

I used to use Lightroom as my editing choice of software for photography and it is good, If you get the chance to try software by PhaseOne called "Capture One Pro 9.0" you will NEVER go back to LR after seeing the results out of Capture One. It is a bit different and a slight learning curve, but you will get it if you understand LR and definitely worth it.


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Offline jannatul18

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Re: Should I convert RAW files to DNG?
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2016, 06:55:50 AM »
Quote from: Diddler date=1467518449 link=msg=281694

A .DNG (Digital Negative Graphics) file is Adobe's version of a RAW file. They can be a little smaller in size in my experiments its about 10% or so. Years ago I used to convert the files to DNG to save disc space, but with HDD being so cheap these day I don't bother.
A RAW file is just that, RAW. It has no editing and is just the image data captured by the camera sensor. So Canon is RAW.cr2 &
Nikon.Nef but they are just RAW data off the sensor in respective brand formats. All you are doing is converting RAW (Canon/Nikon/whatever brand) to Adobe's format of DNG. 

I used to use Lightroom as my editing choice of software for photography and it is good, If you get the chance to try software by PhaseOne called "Capture One Pro 9.0" you will NEVER go back to LR after seeing the results out of Capture One. It is a bit different and a slight learning curve, but you will get it if you understand LR and definitely worth it.

Thank you so much for the detailed info.